June 30, 2011

Deceptive cadence (Re)Making Love

Listen to the piece and that Horowitz plus D.'s heartfelt playing of this piece occurred when his baby-grand entered our home today and D. played this brilliantly, Chapter 8 in (Re)Making Love.



And kudos to the artist who did the cover for the first and now the second edition of (Re)Making Love !



5 comments:

  1. I love the gentleness of his hands, and it made me really see what my daughter's piano teacher meant when she told one of her students to move her hands in more towards the back of the piano when she played. Beautiful.

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  2. Dear Wendy,

    What an insightful comment. I must tell D. about your daughter's piano teacher's advice.

    And have I told you that a second edition of the book is coming out??? A new publisher picked it up. He is fantastic and, though the story is the same, the cover will be more beautiful though much the same, there will be a brief new prologue that I wrote, and I got to correct some minor errors that you probably never even noticed, but I sure did!

    But, of course, I did not change the ending--how could I? It's what happened and the book is a memoir. I keep hoping that you will reread Transom and be impressed by it and edit your review on GoodReads. :) A girl can hope. But I am glad you didn't pull any punches and that you loved The Woman Who Never Cooked--a much tougher book to read. So you are still a great reader for me.

    Do stay in touch and thank you for keeping up with this blog. You are dear to me,

    Mary

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  3. Mary,
    I did re-read the ending of your book, starting at "Transom" and also my review on Goodreads, which still seems pretty positive to me--at least, as a reader, it would get ME interested in reading your book, but then also after the memoir going to your stories. Not sure what you would have me change, but I'm not a rom-com girl, so maybe what strikes me as positive is different. Remember I liked, but didn't love, "Bel Canto", which also drove my friend Dee crazy too as she adored it. And I think your memoir has much more to offer than "Bel Canto" and I hope the review reflects that.

    I love your writing and how it ranges all over the place, and I hope that comes through--it's meant to--but I still am not happy with the book's ending, although in a slightly different way after reading it again.

    Reading it on the blog, which I did this time, I think Paris works much better in that context than in the book, maybe because of the links? Anyway, the Paris part didn't bother me so much as it did the first time. Still, I would end the book earlier, when D. shows up at your apartment in Paris. Why? I've thought about that a lot. I think maybe it's because I don't like to be told too much...I know it's a memoir, and you wanted to tell all, but I would have preferred to imagine what came after the reunion, to fill in the blanks with my own heart and mind.

    Does that make any sense?

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  4. Mary,
    I did re-read the ending of your book, starting at "Transom". I love your writing and how it ranges all over the place, but I still am not happy with the book's ending, although in a slightly different way after reading it again.

    Reading it on the blog, which I did this time, I think Paris works much better in that context than in the book, maybe because of the links? Anyway, the sketchiness of the Paris part didn't bother me so much Still, I would end the book earlier, when D. shows up at your apartment in Paris. Why? I've thought about that a lot. I think maybe it's because I don't like to be told too much...I know it's a memoir, and you wanted to tell all, but I would have preferred to imagine what came after the reunion, to fill in the blanks with my own heart and mind.

    Does that make any sense?

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  5. You are lovely, Wendy, to spend so much time on my work and to continue visiting this blog. My heart goes out to you.

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